In addition to his etchings, Picasso’s original, hand-signed linocuts exemplify his immense innovation and talent as a printmaker. Picasso pioneered the linocut medium during his time spent living in Vallauris in the 1940s and 1950s, where he experimented with the material of linoleum to create linocut prints. Bold yet minimal coloration and sharp juxtapositions define his linocut imagery. Often composed of rich, dark tones and opaque shapes, Picasso’s hand-signed linocuts display a rich sense of texture, contrast, precision, and animation. One such work, Buste de femme d’après Cranach le Jeune, 1958 sold for over $550,000 in 2008.